Need ideas on my new pond filtration systems
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    Greetings to all sifu and seniors.

    I'm a newby in this hobby and just finished building up my koi pond. My pond size is around 10x5x4 feet (exclusive filter) occupied by 20 tosai's. i'm not sure if the fish quantity is nice or overstock for the pond's size.

    My filter systems size is 4x5x4 feet and contain 5 chambers. It is 40% of my pond size. Below is my settings for the filter:
    Chamber 1: Haven't put anything yet at the moment. just thinking to install some brushes but not actually understand what the brush works for.
    Chamber 2: A mechanical filter. Yellow smooth soft pad which traps a very small particles on the top part while few layer of Japanese map underneath. Without the yellow pad water turn out cloudy extremely fast. unfortunately it is wear and tear and need replacement every week.
    Chamber 3: Black sponge filter which also act as a mechanical filter.
    chamber 4: Coral and crystal bio media.
    Chamber 5: Had not been occupied. Submersible pump is installed in this chamber and the water is pump out to the fountain and straight to the pond. I'm using lifetech SP633 which max output is 33K liters per hour.

    Some bio balls is bought but uncertain where should it be locate. Some info from google state that it is used for dry wet condition. Could i put it on the last chamber and let it float on the water? The other ideas is to put it on the fountain which is dryer and water flowing fast.

    I attach some of the image for clearer message.

    Appreciate that i could gain some ideology and though from your valuable experience on setting up the filters.

    Thanks and best regards,

    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/13854/filter systems.jpg
    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/13855/tosai.jpg
    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/13856/bio balls fountain.jpg
    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/13857/pond.jpg
  • MfwleeMfwlee September 2013
    Posts: 355
    You can get some very good filter related information by browsing the forum and trying to understand the reasons behind each type of application. Structurally, your filter size compared to the pond is enviable.

    Generally, most of us separate the our filters into the MECHANICAL part, and the BIOLOGICAL part. The Mechanical part is where the media is chosen for their ability to remove suspended solids, while the Biological part is where the Nitrogen cycle is accelerated so that Ammonia can be converted to Nitrite, and then to Nitrate. All this is very well covered in the forum, as well as on the internet - have a close look, and you will find that we normally design our Mechanical section for easy maintenance so that we can easily flush them every few days, while we try to avoid overly agitating the sensitive Biological sections.

    My concern is that this process takes a few weeks to establish in the pond if it is new. Your 20 tosai is fine for the time being if you have a filter that is matured. If you have a new filter, then the load imposed by these 20 fish will have to be monitored very closely - Ammonia and Nitrite being of prime concern. In a new pond, we refer to this process as New Pond Syndrome ( NPS ) - again, reading up on this is easy.

    Welcome to the forum - and yell anytime you need help. There are many friends here who are only too happy to provide assistance.
    Mike Lee
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    Hi bro Lee,

    Thanks for your advise. I will go through the forum to obtained for the information. There are many terms/words which i still don't understand. There's a miles a way to go to understand this hobby.

    Regarding the pond size (10x5x4 feet) , is there any possibilities for them to grow up into jumbo koi? In the initial stage of building the pond I was thinking that it was big enough for them. After time passed by and seeing so much giant pond in this forum my mind start to changed and feel that it was too narrow.

    Would you help to determine these koi's potential. I was too weak at this point. The showa is from Dainichi farm, sex unknown, size 21cm. while the sanke is from Ooya. sex female size 24cm. The Tancho and shiro utsuri (female) i don't have much information on them since they comes without certificate.

    They below picture been snap 2 moths ago when I purchased the koi. They are scared and getting wild every time I tried to catch them therefore I don't have the latest picture. Sometimes there are bleeding and make me trauma.

    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/13883/dainici showa ooya sanke.jpgwww.koianswers.com/discussion/download/13884/tancho utsuri.jpg

    Looking forward for you replies.

    Regards,
    Jee
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    How about...
    Chamber 1 - Sieve net
    Chamber 2 - Brushes (I don't recommend the use of the sponge for ponds, clog too fast)
    Chamber 3- Japanese matting
    Chamber 4 - Crystal bio and bio rings/bio balls or just more crystal bio
    Chamber 5 - Pump chamber. Oyster shell or coral for pH buffering. (Preferrably oyster shell, easier to clean than coral) (Optional - Submersible UV light)
    That's my suggestion :)

    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
    Post edited by ChengAun at 2013-09-16 09:56:49 pm
  • ashfaqashfaq September 2013
    Posts: 799
    Thanks,
    Ashfaq from India-Chennai
  • mustainemustaine September 2013
    Posts: 71
    <blockquote rel="ChengAun">How about...
    Chamber 1 - Sieve net
    Chamber 2 - Brushes (I don't recommend the use of the sponge for ponds, clog too fast)
    Chamber 3- Japanese matting
    Chamber 4 - Crystal bio and bio rings/bio balls or just more crystal bio
    Chamber 5 - Pump chamber. Oyster shell or coral for pH buffering. (Preferrably oyster shell, easier to clean than coral) (Optional - Submersible UV light)
    That's my suggestion :)

    </blockquote>
    which part should i put activated carbon?
    before/after bio rings ??
  • MfwleeMfwlee September 2013
    Posts: 355
    Have a look here for some discussion on activated carbon - http://www.koiphen.com/forums/showthread.php?9403-ACTIVATED-CARBON!-Which-is-best

    On my part, I do not use it as I change approximately 20% of the pond water with treated ( dechlorinated ) fresh water every week.

    ChengAun's suggestion is very close to what I have used for more than 10 years - it works very well !

    Your pond is one of the smaller ones and is therefore easier to maintain. Just keep an eye on stocking levels as your koi grow ( the lower your stocking level, and the more you feed, the faster and better they grow ), watch your water perimeters with test kits for Ammonia, Nitrite and Ph - and let the fish look after themselves !

    When surfing for information - have a look also at recommended stocking levels - especially as the fish grow. It is a common mistake to overstock when we are just getting into the hobby.
    Mike Lee
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    As far as I know, there is some debate to activated carbon. Personally I think , if your water has a yellowness to it, then go ahead and put some in the filter. But over the long term may be some problems such as frequent replacing, have to take out if medicating, to name a few.
    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
  • BthineshkumarBthineshkumar September 2013
    Posts: 1,763
    My suggestion:

    Chamber 1 - Brushes
    Chamber 2 - Sieve . (All the big particles trap in brushes and only fine particles trap in sieve)
    Chamber 3- Bio Ring / Bacteria House (much more easier to clean compared to Jap mat)
    Chamber 4 - Crystal bio and bio rings
    Chamber 5 - Pump chamber. Oyster shell and UV (don't recoment coral as long term it can be breading ground for bad bacteria. Moreover, it will keep increasing pH )
  • BthineshkumarBthineshkumar September 2013
    Posts: 1,763
    Activate carbon works well to absorb chlorine. It would be best to place in at incoming water source.
    I personally don't recommend to put in filter chamber. Activate carbon would absorb all medication, as such you need to remove every time you put in medication. It will absorb the cause of bad smell in pond, but doesn't last long. You need to change it regularly.
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    Uncle @Bthineshkumar , I agree with the activated carbon point, better for prefilter before water refills the pond. And about the corals, oyster shells are easier to clean, but they both serve the same function. It was once said that corals because they collect more dirt, may be an indirect cause of hikkui. Bacteria house can be used in chamber filters, but requires more aeration by putting adequate amounts of air supply underneath.
    Japanese matting, if used correctly, is a very effective media, both biological and mechanical.
    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
  • BthineshkumarBthineshkumar September 2013
    Posts: 1,763
    :-)) :-)) Uncle again :-))

    I once coral would keep increasing pH till 8++ , but oyster shell only buffer pH from sudden pH crash. IMPO, jap mat very hard to clean. Thats the reason, in my new setup, I don't use jap mat.Depends on the filter system used, and proper mechanical filtration, we can eliminate jap mat.

    Agree on the Bac house. Adequent air supply can make the Bac house a gud media.

    Cheers
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    Mesti lah uncle mah :-))
    Once again, it depends on how you arrange your jap mat. Supposedly in the honeycomb arrangement style, cleaning is easy and effective.
    My tiny pond filtration is the simplest. 1st tier, sieve and Jap foam, 2nd tier Momotaro bacteria house and 3rd tier ogata crystal bio with a sheet of Jap foam on top, just to clean off any excess solids :p
    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    Hi Sifu's,

    Is anybody there experienced change from traditional filter to trickle tower filter systems? the trickle tower that I mean is mechanical and biological included in the same tower. The systems is as below:
    1 layer: sieve
    2 layer: Jap mat
    3 layer:bio ring
    4 layer: Crystal bio
    5 layer: oyster shell

    I was thinking to change to the trickle tower because my traditional filter was consuming so much space(40% of the pond size). therefore the filter space could be used to expand the pond size. Some say that mechanical filter should be place before the submersible pump and biological is acceptable to place after. I have a doubt on this statement. Anyway will this systems provide a good clarity to water?

    Bro TK,
    I was so wondering your filter design without using Japanese matt :/ My water clarity depends 110% on the jap matt. Cleaning the jap matt is a very worst and hard thing to do. Every time I remove the jap matt for cleaning, debris will fall into water and makes the pond cloudy. Share us some tips [-O<
    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/13898/TrickleFilter.jpg
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    In my humble opinion, bakki shower is more effective than trickle filter because of the higher flow rate, therefore better turnover rate of the filter and therefore better filtering.
    I use a bakki shower only in my pond. And try to get spacing between each tier of the filter for better aeration and degassing. Jap mat, ideally jap mat is used as a bio media, so that means your mechanical filter isn't suffice, and the solid particles still are aplenty in the bio part. :)
    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    Bro CA,

    can you describe a bit what is the differences between trickle filter and bakki shower? it looks same to me. my pump is running 33k liter per hour. I tink the flow rate is quite high for pond below than 10 tons. Jap matt is not a mechanical filter? another wrong understanding again. Then what would you suggest to be add up for mechanical filter? I went to yamagoshi today and they suggest to go for waterco sytems. but it's quite pricey. #:-s
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    The main difference between trickle filter and bakki showers are the flow rate. In trickle filters, as the name suggests, the water trickles slowly over the media (Usually bio balls or a plastic based one), whereas in the case of a bakki shower, the flow rate is much higher, the higher the better and the media used can vary (Mostly ceramic based but anything can be used). Japanese matting can be used both as a mechanical and/or biological, but if the problem is that it's hard to clean, then better off as a biological filter. For mechanical, perhaps a DIY sieve (search in the forum, plenty of ideas) would be effective followed by brushes perhaps. Or, brushes followed by sieve, up to you. Waterco systems, maybe for now stick with the traditional filtration first, when you get to the champion koi level then maybe can :D
    Sorry for any misunderstanding, I'm no sifu here :)

    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
  • MfwleeMfwlee September 2013
    Posts: 355
    Brushes would be a good choice for mechanical filtration because they are comparatively easier to clean if the design of your filter allows for it. On mine, the brushes are in the first chamber, and I have a drain valve in every chamber. Turn off the flow, flush with tap water, and you are done. ( Do not have to disturb the Bio part at all )
    Alternatively, I used to have a simple system where the brushes can be lifted out for cleaning - but this is very messy when compared to flushing inside the chamber.

    Read up a bit on the Waterco - I recently installed one, but I do not yet have sufficient empirical information that I would confidently share. How does the water look - crystal clear. Does it save a lot of work ? You bet it does. Is it a viable long term solution ? Do not know yet, and my fingers and toes are still crossed.
    Mike Lee
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    I founded a DIY filter on you tube which cost very cheap and easy for cleaning. Please share your though.
    Post edited by jee at 2013-09-22 11:32:45 pm
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    Post edited by jee at 2013-09-22 11:33:07 pm
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    Personally I see no need for this, because you already have a chamber filter, just a bit of improvement can be made and should be good.
    Here's a video of Uncle Borman's filtration. I hope uncle Borman @ikankoikau doesn't mind me sharing his vid :)

    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    Bro CA,
    Actually the plan is to expand the pond size by eliminate the filter chamber. Therefore I could have more pond length from 10 feet to 15 feet. For that reason new filter systems is needed. the concern is could I have a good quality water after eliminate the current chamber filter. A smaller filter size but with high efficient systems might help to archive the target.

    BTW Thanks for sharing the video. the systems looks easier to clean compare to my chamber filter. I wish I could have some more space to allocate the chamber filter. The space is really constraining.
    Post edited by jee at 2013-09-23 07:50:44 pm
  • ChengAunChengAun September 2013
    Posts: 925
    Then personally I feel, a standalone bakki shower system would be effective for your case. Excellent filtration while taking up small amounts of space, and providing suffice aeration. Just pump straight from a bottom drain to the bakki shower
    Be updated in the world of koi. Jangankan seperti "Koi di bawah bottom drain"
  • jeejee September 2013
    Posts: 20
    Bro CA,
    The effectiveness of the water is measure base on the ammonia, nitrate and nitrite level is it? the current reading is ammonia 15mg, nitrate 40ppm, nitrite don't have the test kit. the pond had been running for 3 months and I think it is matured enough for good bacteria to colonies. Let see how it goes with the new filtration and additional 40% pond size.
    Thank you so much for your guidance which will avoid some newbie mistakes. i shall update you the progress.
  • MfwleeMfwlee September 2013
    Posts: 355
    Ammonia, Nitrite, pH and Nitrate are the common substances to look out for. Among them, Ammonia and Nitrite are the most dangerous and it pays to watch out like a hawk when your filter is not yet established, or when you start to make changes like increasing your stocking levels.
    Satisfactory readings are achieved if Ammonia and Nitrite are in the non detectable range, pH should be around neutral ( some prefer it slightly alkaline ), and nitrate not exceeding your 40ppm if possible.
    Mike Lee
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    Dear friends,
    I was in the middle of reconstructing the pond. Is it okay to locate the settlement chamber above the water level? I bought few cheap fibre glass tanks and planned to use it as a filter. The submersibles pump will suck all the dirt and goes to settlement chamber, Mechanical and biological filter before goes back to fountain and pond. Heard that use pump to suck the debris will cause them to crunch and easily turn into powder, hence make it hard for the mechanical filter efficiency . Have anyone use this setup before. Please share your though.
    Building SC filter at water level is my last option. I need to dig until 5 feet,concrete and it will cause a lot of job.

    Thanks.
  • MfwleeMfwlee October 2013
    Posts: 355
    Yes, given identical filters, the gravity fed one will almost always give you clearer water compared to a pump fed one because of the reason that you have already identified - but the difference may not be very large. In my case when I did this many years ago, I could notice the small difference, but my family members and friends could not !
    Coming to the fellas in question - our koi - they actually prefer mud ponds compared to the sterile water that we are all trying to achieve !

    Crystal clarity is very much an owner induced satisfaction exercise and the cost of getting to the last few percent of clarity is always expensive !

    Best of luck on your reconstruction and remember to always have bottom drains for each chamber - easier when you do the cleaning of the filter material. :)
    Mike Lee
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    Thanks for your response bro Lee. The planned had changed again :-D I'm going to dig a soil and make it as filter so it's going to be a gravity fed systems. Please refer to the attach drawing. Do you have anything to comment? I have a doubt why most of the pond don't have stainless steel on the mechanical filter. 100 micron suppose to be good to trap the fine particle is it? Is there any reason behind? Another thing did all the chamber really require a bottom drain? wasn't the particle already filter at settlement chamber and mechanical chamber stage? :/ confused

    I'm running sub pump 33k liters per hour. With 2 bottom drain (2 inch pipe) and 1 skimmer (2 inch stand pipe. i don't know if it's correct to call skimmer) would it sufficient for the turn over rate?

    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/14234/new design.png
  • MfwleeMfwlee October 2013
    Posts: 355
    " Another thing did all the chamber really require a bottom drain? wasn't the particle already filter at settlement chamber and mechanical chamber stage? "

    My personal preference is to have the flexibility to flush each and every chamber in my gravity fed system so that the water does not have to go into the pond. My reason is that I have my uv in the last chamber and this causes some sedimentation, and also, I flush the entire filter with pond water following an extended electricity cut. The bottom drain allows me to avoid having to pump the water to the pond.

    Also think about a valve before and after the last chamber where you have your pump. This will allow for easier pump service when the time comes. I did not plan for this, and pump servicing is now a wet experience !

    My suggestion is that since you are going to so much trouble already, try to build in the same flexibility ?
    Mike Lee
  • HDCuHDCu October 2013
    Posts: 1,117
    Bro Jee

    I have reviewed your drawing and here are my comments:
    1. 33k liters per hour is too strong that you will just drain the bio filters empty.
    2. Two inch pipe bottom drain is nonsense. Go for two four inch bottom drain with each drain pipe connected separately going to the
    settlement chamber.
    3. The transfer pipe per chamber should be at least 2 x 4 inch or one 6 inch to reduce tracking of water and lower chance of chamber getting drained.
    4. A 4 square feet of stainless mesh with 100 microns will take from as little as 10 minutes to only as long as 1 hour before it gets block. If you are planning to clean as often as it will get block then go ahead but do remember once its block the pump will suck dry your biofilter and all filtration will stop until you clean the filter again.
    5. Unless you dont plan to clean the bio chambers do put some bottom drain on it as well.
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    Bro Lee,
    Thanks for your suggestion. I will add bottom drain for each of the chamber and also will consider to add valve in the filter. But no idea how and where to install the valve yet. i'm going to google it later.

    Bro HDCu,
    Thanks for your comment. I don't think to have so much time cleaning the stainless steel every hour. What item should I used to replaced the stainless steel? will Jap matt alone able to trap all the mesh? if you have anything else to add please let me know. The digging process going to start by this weekend.
  • HDCuHDCu October 2013
    Posts: 1,117
    Bro Jee,

    i estimate your new pond will have around 7.4 thousand liters while your filter area will hold around 1400 liters.

    i recommend a filter retention time from four to ten minutes in a submerged heavy aerated setup.

    This means if your pump is 33 thousand liters your retention time will be very fast at around less than three minutes. This means your settlement chamber will be less effective while you may need to use more filter media( which will eat up more space and lower even the retention time). While a fast turnover is good one needs to consider how effective the bio can handle it.

    A technique to slow down the current in the settlement chamber is to provide an opposing current that prevent waste from being push all the way to the bio chamber. You can do this putting lots of brushes that disrupt the flow or just put three rows of brushes with an aircurtain after the three brushes. This creates a an opposing current which effectively traps 95 percent. of the waste in just three rows of brushes and in the settlement chamber. Remember more brushes means more cleaning time and space required. Less brushes less cleaning and less space. The drawback though is you would need an aircurtain that creates an opposing current. The stronger the pump you use the the stronger you need the aircurtain or else waste will pass thru the brushes. The finer the airbubbles also the more effective.

  • grinkz01grinkz01 October 2013
    Posts: 530
    bro hdcu how is air curtain can act as counter current? it will just create turbulence and put more debris to next chamber?

    2) u mention 33k pump will resulting 3 minutes retention. how to calculate this? my rough calculation is 3.88x cycles/hrs.

    bro jee...maybe u want to put screen maybe can consider a cascade screen at various micron size...arrange from the biggest to finest opening.

    are u considering rotary drum filter as ur mechanical filter? other alternatif as bro hdcu suggestion: put brush in ur settlement chamber
  • HDCuHDCu October 2013
    Posts: 1,117
    Bro Grink

    1. If you put the aircurtain in the settlement the dirt will not settle. If you put a fine air curtain after the last row of brush it created a counter current whereby dirt is hold in the first two rows of brush and some fall down the settlement chamber while the last row of brushes stays cleaner. I find this works for me.
    2. Ive computed the estimated volume of the filter space available is 1500 liters. If you put in the media the available volume of water in the filter will be less depending on the kind of media. Assuming its around 66 percent then its only 1000 liters of water in the filter when the filter is full. If your flow is 6000 liters per hour then the retention time of the water is around 10 minutes. If the flow is12000 liters then its 5 minutes retention time. If its 30000 liters per hour then its 2 minutes retention time. Do consider if you plan a submerged setup and want a fast turnover the filter size should be big enough to accomodate more media as well.
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    Hi bro Grinkz,
    I'll go with bro HDCu recommendation. Add brush as the mechanical filter. Cheap and no need for maintenance. The rotary drum require motor to operate and if it break down it require for a replacement.

    Bro HDCu,
    For the filter volume I will add 1 more feet for depth and width therefore more retention time will be obtain. What is your suggestion for the water flow? up down or zig-zag? Which 1 is the best? Appreciate if you could attach a picture. It would be the best becos I'm still a newbie and hard to understand in word and terms.
  • MfwleeMfwlee October 2013
    Posts: 355
    " Add brush as the mechanical filter. Cheap and no need for maintenance."

    You are well on your way to a professional koi pond with the help of all the experts - but just a small clarification from me. In my system, brushes fill the first chamber, and while they will last for years and years, they do require flushing every few days. I originally had to lift them out for this, and the mess was something that I could not stand. The fitting of a bottom drain solved this problem - and I now simply flush in situ with my garden hose.

    All the best ! :)
    Mike Lee
  • HDCuHDCu October 2013
    Posts: 1,117
    Bro Jee,

    You can add one more feet for the filter BUT do consider the weight of the matts when you plan to clean it. Larger Matts are heavy.

    I do not use anymore the up down filter design but I have migrated to a horizontal filter design plus bakki

    You can visit my thread filter setup
    http://www.koianswers.com/discussion/1534/hdcu-new-pond-build/#Item_95

    [IMG]http://i1070.photobucket.com/albums/u499/sacicu/20131025_095247.jpg[/IMG]
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    Not a professional la..just from beginner to semi amateur :p
    You did provide me a lot of info. Really appreciate that. The pond construction start today. I hope this time it's going well not like last time. I don't have koi kichi member to advise and the result point to the headache. But now I have tons of information which do and don'ts. This forum is like a kiosk & professional consultant center already :-))
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    Thanks bro HDCU,
    I got a clearer picture now. Got some minor problem during the renovation. There are house water piping at 3 feet beneath the dry chamber location. Is there possible for a dry chamber depth at 3 feet while the settlement at 4 feet(same as the pond deepest level)? Otherwise I am going to locate the dry chamber at other places. Thanks in advanced
  • HDCuHDCu October 2013
    Posts: 1,117
    Hi Bro Jee,

    My filter including the settlement is just 28 inches max water depth so I dont see any problem filter not deep. Why do you need a dry chamber if you plan on using a submersible.
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    A dry chamber will suck out the debris from settlement chamber through the botom drain is it? Therefore I could daily flush out the debris without constraining so much on the jap matts. Please correct me if my theory is wrong.

    www.koianswers.com/discussion/download/14265/settlement_section.jpg
    Post edited by jee at 2013-10-26 10:42:54 pm
  • HDCuHDCu October 2013
    Posts: 1,117
    Bro Jee

    If your settlement drain pipe can be connected to the sewer line that would be best as you would only need a stand pipe to block and open it without a need of a pump. My concern whenever the drain needs to be.comnected to a pump to drain out the water you run the risk of running the pump dry.

    In my setup my settlement drain pipe is connected directly to the sewage drain through a 4 inch pipe. It takes me less than 30 seconds to drain my whole filter chamber from settlement to biofilter. My filter pump automatically stops once the water level drops to a certain level. I have the option to flush from 25 percent to 100 percent of my water in the filter.
    Post edited by HDCu at 2013-10-27 07:06:51 am
  • jeejee October 2013
    Posts: 20
    Bro HDCu,
    Thanks for the brilliant idea. You help me to eliminate the space capacity on the drain chamber. I think my preparation for a complete filter is ready. thanks again

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