Time to Fast your Kois ?
  • lautslauts December 2010
    Posts: 1,248
    Hi all,

    Below taken from another forum by JR, a well respected koi personality. What are your views and practise?
    We do not have cold temps down to 60F, but note the cloudy days and lower temp( mine is 27.5C) now, should we reduce feed , at least switch to lower protein ?

    To share , personally i have switch to wheatgerm plus colour enhancer from High protein/colour. Qty fed reduced from 28scoop to 10 scoops ie 65% reduction, since two weeks ago. Will continue this (maybe reduce further ?) for another one month at least. This on top of one day rest per week. Note my kois are mix of tosais to 6plus yrs old.

    :-) :-)
    Rgd
    ts


    Quote: JR ( Koi Bito)

    " I introduced the idea of the benefits of fasting koi for a period of time in the winter not because the Japanese breeders taught me that koi are 'four season' fish but rather because I researched the nature of the fish the Japanese called the four season fish. And like most of the 'old fashioned' views of the folks who made these fish, the science checked out.

    The koi is ruled by its endocrine system. And like many forms of life in the wild, it is highly tuned to seasonal triggers- physiologically speaking. The main agents of these triggers are temperature and light. Indeed the koi receives triggers via the eye and the head to the brain. And a series of cascading hormones begin to shift the body's metabolism to create different internal conditions. This is also why the Japanese see a koi as growing in different ways during different times of the year.
    The koi is complicated, much more complicated than say a tropical fish and as such is;
    1) A hardy species
    2) A survivor of less than ideal conditions.

    In the book I'm writing, I go into the concept of survival vs. flourishing in great detail and I hope many of you get a chance to read it.

    Beyond the issues of survival vs. flourishing there is also the idea that within each evolutionary success story is an Achilles' heel. In the case of the koi, a temperate water species, there exists a down side to what the Japanese refer to as ' endless summer'.

    In short, the koi benefits from a drop in calorie intake when the triggers are present even if it is difficult to get a koi into stasis (again stasis can be a tonic to a threat to survival). This should correspond with the lowest lighting periods and the lowest temperature ranges. And 6 weeks is adequate to pay homage to this evolutionary physiological imperative - JR "
  • cookcpucookcpu December 2010
    Posts: 462
    From what I read that koi have the most appetite when temperature is around 22 to 24 C.

    Since we are from a hot country. I believe when the weather is very hot that is 30 C we should reduce our feed.

    As the temperature now is getting around 27 C, in fact, I am increasing my feed since they started to eat more and the only exception is during the raining day when the pH might be lower therefore increasing feeding might not be a good idea.

    Just my noobie view of koi feeding in our hot country. Then I might be wrong. :D
  • AndySittAndySitt December 2010
    Posts: 560
    Well I have started my minimal feed regime in preparation for the Shinkokai show.. Koi shows are a great motivating factor for me to fast my fishes, else I pump them with lots of food.. But thru my short experience in raising koi.. dont overfeed high protein food.. You might get good body but how long does it last?
  • lautslauts December 2010
    Posts: 1,248
    Bro cpu,

    I was also thinking abt this, but decided i have to start somewhere. i do agree that in high temp like 30C feeding should be less and low protein. That perhaps can be another season? 4 season fish remember.

    Bro Andy,

    I think that is one advantage of joining koi shows, you are forced to fast your kois :-)
    Don't overfeed high protein is solid advise. IMHO koi keeping is a journey not destination, no need to rush la , :-) except when going for new koi arrivals at dealers :-) :-)


    rgd
    ts

  • cookcpucookcpu December 2010
    Posts: 462
    Bro ts,

    Since my pond don't have a chiller so this rainy season my pond temperature is around 27 C so I treat it as a good season to growth them more.

    We don't have 4 season so I treat the water temperature as a sign of "season change". :D

    I am just testing whether this way will work better. Like feed more during the rainy season (Oct to March) and feed less during the hot season. (April to September)

    The only problem I encounter is the dirt from the building structure falling into my pond and bird dropping during this season which cause a lot of problem to the koi. This morning I lost a small koi which I do not know what happen.

    Yesterday, this koi flare it gill and it stop swimming and this morning the koi went back to Japan.

    Now all my koi are parking. I going to put some prazi pro and see what how it goes for the next 4 days.
  • lautslauts December 2010
    Posts: 1,248
    Bro cpu,

    Yes , i can see the justification to follow the 'season' , hot weather feed less ( our "winter") colder weather (rainy) then take it as "summer", and feed more. The variation we can do is not only qty fed but also the food type like from high protein to wheatgerm.

    On your kois parking, have you measured the pH and do big ( 30% ) water change? Why prazi? Did you have new kois or had previous infections? Are they flashing? If not unlikely to be flukes. Flukes unlikely to kill kois so fast. Other parasite like Tric or Costia or white spot could work that fast, not flukes. These parasite (ie Tric, Costia and white spot) can infect the gills too , causing gill to overload with mucus thus suffocates them. Try MGF or PP, better options. Good luck bro.

    rgd
    ts





  • KaajKaaj December 2010
    Posts: 376
    Sorry. I thought feeding during the hot season should be more frequent vs the cool season. Isnt this the case in japan. Eg, the big koi breeders actually move their koi into heated houses during winter so they can continue to feed and grow the koi as opposed to sending them to the ponds where the water does not support much life forms to eat?

  • lautslauts December 2010
    Posts: 1,248
    Bro Kaaj,

    There is an optimal temp for koi feeding. At 30C and above , feeding is reduced as kois will not have the appetite apparently. Their ability to digest will not be there to support heavy feeding bro.

    ts
  • PH8PH8 December 2010
    Posts: 683
    Bro Kaaj, think of it this way. Those in temperate climates feed more during their hot season (summer) because the temperatures move UP to within the optimum feeding range during that time. For us in tropical climates, the temperatures move DOWN to within the optimum feeding range during our COOL season, so it would make sense to pump feeding during our cool season. :-)
  • KaajKaaj December 2010
    Posts: 376
    Cheers GUYS. That explains increase in appetite the koi seem to be having over the past month. I have been whacking >500gms of food (primarily FD + Saki Color) per day (10koi between 50-65cm, 8 koi between 35-45cm) and they still want more. Downside is there seems to be an increase in gulping, even some of the smaller koi are breaking the water surface. Also, have had to backwash every other day since the water has lots of fines.

    Today is the last of the heavy feeding. Will switch to 300gms sakai wheatgerm till weekend, then cut-off food till next weekend, keep salination at 0.3%, double dose daily of bentonite clay and backwash daily. Hopefully a few koi will be in good form for the show... :)

    Cheers

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